Knit City 2012 (or the best way to have fun at the Croatian Cultural Centre)

Free Stuff – wheeee!

I’m so glad I got up early today – I managed to be among the first 50 attendees at Knit City 2012 this morning and was lucky enough to receive a gorgeous Knit City tote filled with awesome freebies:

Just look at all the awesome stuff I got!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seriously Gorgeous Yarn – SweetGeorgia and Blue Sky Alpacas

Then I trolled the many vendor booths before deciding on some very special items.  First off, I picked up a skein of SweetGeorgia Yarns‘ specially dyed Tough Love Sock.  It’s an exclusive colourway called “Knit Social 2012”, made especially for Knit City.  I’ll probably use it for a scarf or shawl or cowl or… who knows!  Just look at it.  It is gorgeousness:

Tough Love Sock in “Knit Social 2012”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I also stopped to chat with the gals at the Knits by the Sea booth (they’re from beautiful Tofino) and snagged some Blue Sky Alpacas Sport Weight yarn in a delicious green at 50% off.  There’s no colour name on the tag so I’m calling it Lime Squishy.  Because it’s a lime-y green and it’s very squishy.  This yarn must be touching skin at all times and therefore has “cowl” written all over it.

Blue Sky Alpacas “Lime Squishy” Sport Weight

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then I went back to the ATM and got some more money for the piece de resistance, SweetGeorgia’s CashLuxe Fine (in “Charcoal” and “Silver”) and Silk Mist (in “Mist”) to make her Five by Five cowl.  My respiratory system almost shut down when I clapped eyes on these colours and buried my face in the heavenly softness of this yarn.  I’m sorry people, but there really is no substitute for the combination of cashmere and silk.

SweetGeorgia’s CashLuxe Fine and Silk Mist

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What’s the best kind of book?  A knitting book, of course!

I also sprang for some books, both of which I’ve been coveting and both of which the authors signed for me.  Sigh.

First is Alexa Ludeman and Emily Wessel‘s ridiculously fantastic new book, Pacific Knits.  Not only are they simply beautiful designs, but all of them are written to fit babies from 0-6 months all the way up to adult sized 4XL.  (Whhaaaa!??  Everyone should be doing this!) Would someone please alert the Nobel committee – these gals deserve a prize for total awesomeness!  Bonus points – I had a lovely chat with the uber-talented Alexa at her booth – she and her wee newborn bairn were a delight.

Pacific Knits

Also added to my library is the amazing and beautiful Jane Richmond‘s new book, Island, available as a special pre-release at Knit City.  Elegant, original and fresh, this collection of luxe accessories and sweaters is breathtaking.  Beautifully photographed, this books inspires me to spend every waking moment knitting.  Go to luvinthemommyhood to read more and watch a cool preview video.

ISLAND: A Collection on Vimeo.

Can’t wait for Knit City 2013

Thanks Knit Social for an amazing event.  I had a blast meeting and talking to my fellow knitting obsessives.  I’ll definitely be up again at the crack of dawn to snag more swag at Knit City 2013!  But for now, if you’ll excuse me, I need to put my new yarn on the bed and roll around in it whilst I read my new books.   🙂

 

Test-knitting, an FO and the Yarn Harlot in Vancouver

Okay, enough pet-peeving. Let’s get back to what really matters: knitting and stuff I’ve been working on!

Now and Zen (Cardigan, that is)

When I first clapped eyes on al-abrigo‘s Zen Cardigan a few weeks ago, I knew I must make it. The pattern wasn’t available yet so I just added it to the favourites pile for future reference. Of course, I have no particular babies to knit for but if a certain someone’s next grandchild is a girl, this is for her. Otherwise, I’ll tuck it away in the gift stash.  Anyhoo, I’m minding my own business trolling Ravelry as I’m wont to do when suddenly I see an opportunity to test knit Zen. Hmmm. Let me think it over. Not!  No thinking required! Of course I volunteered immediately and, as soon as humanly possible, cast on for the 12-18 months size.

It calls for a sport weight yarn so straight away I think of Baby Cashmerino by Debbie Bliss in a deliciously delicate pale, pale lilac that I found at Urban Yarns in Edgemont Village. Here it is in progress. Ain’t it purdy?

Zen Cardigan in progress

Some people like to dis Debbie Bliss yarns but Baby Cashmerino really is lovely. Yes, it’s pricey but dammit, don’t all little babies need at least one expensive handknit woolie made with love? Besides, DB’s colours are scrumptious. And this yarn is good for gifting – no need for the harried new mom to worry too much about hand washing. I’ve got four skeins which is enough for the cardi and a wee matching Parisian beret, non?

Baby Cashmerino – pale lilac

FO Update – Willow Tweed Aranami Shawl

As a human magpie, if something isn’t shiny and right in front of my face, I forget about it and it falls off my radar. Anyway, I’m crawling on the floor of my knitting room the other day arranging the layout of the jolly squares for POP Blanket, and I see folded ever so neatly on the daybed my luscious Willow Tweed Aranami Shawl and it occurred to me that I have failed to share an FO photo of it with the world.  Here it is, resplendent in my back garden:

Willow Tweed Aranami in my backyard

This is one of my very most favourite projects. It’s soooooo nice to touch, it’s soft and squishy and just warm enough to keep the chill off your neck when walking the dog late on a summer’s night. (Okay, if you live anywhere else but Vancouver, you’re thinking: what? Chilly on a summer night? WTF? But in Vancouver, nine times out of ten, it can get dang cold on July evenings.)

Yarn Harlot – Knitting for Speed and Efficiency

Thanks to Knit Social for a fun evening on July 12. Stephanie Pearl-McPhee was in town to teach the rabble how to knit faster in her class Knitting for Speed and Efficiency at the downtown branch of the Vancouver Public Library.

Lord knows I could stand to pick up the pace. If I want to use up even half of the yarn stored under the beds, in the closets and under the floorboards before my 100th birthday, I’m going to have to go into overdrive.

Of course, the number one way to knit faster is this: Stop knitting so bloody slow. Thankfully, Stephanie didn’t actually say that to us. Instead, she gave us a very entertaining talk about the history of knitting, why the modern knitter is so slow and gave us tips to increase our speed. We learned how the craft evolved from being a way for the great unwashed to earn a living while tromping across the moors (they enjoyed eating at least once a day and were therefore serious speed knitters) to a pleasant way for the great washed to while away empty afternoons in the drawing-room while Bates and Mrs. Hughes scurried about understairs decanting wine and admonishing scullery maids.

I often walk while knitting but usually look slightly less grim than our little Shetland friend here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With the advent of machine knitting, the uppercrusters took up the needles and “civilized” needlework by making it an idle pastime rather than a way to feed one’s family. In it’s newly respectable incarnation, knitting was no longer a race against time, but a way to squander your afternoons. Much like Pinterest and Ravelry are nowadays.

Our grandmothers learned the “slow” Victorian way to knit which they in turn taught us, rather than the super-speedy “lever” method of the peasantry that Stephanie then showed us. Check this video of Stephanie demonstrating the lever method using long straight needles, with the right one stuck under her arm. Very interesting, no?

It was definitely fun and eye-opening to learn a new method. I’ll likely not be switching to lever knitting any time soon, but I have refined my technique to make my “throwing” hand move more lever-like and have therefore definitely increased my speed. Also, by “spring-loading” the stitches on your left needle and consciously eliminating extraneous hand and finger movements (including stopping every row to admire one’s work), you experience less fatigue and can go faster than before. Plus, Stephanie is a very engaging speaker and we all had loads of fun learning from her.  It was a great group of knitters.

Thanks again to Knit Social – by the way, can’t wait for Knit City this October!